Die Konferenz zu Docker und Co.
Mannheim, Congress Center Rosengarten,
13.-16. November 2018

// Keynote: A Cloud Without Handcuffs – The Containerization Opportunity

Organizations are moving to the cloud to stay competitive with easier access to the compute resources they need. Along the way, many organizations are reconsidering the critical components of their infrastructure including: monitoring, identity, infrastructure management, secret stores, and data stores. And the cloud providers are providing replacements for these components.

There is a catch with cloud provider solutions though! The cloud providers are building products with a type of lock-in that is brand new: APIs and software tied to specific data centers. It goes beyond the lock-in we have seen in the past and breaks down the consumer friendly trend of hardware commoditization in the PC era.

But Open Source Cloud Native technologies like Kubernetes enable you to retake control. With careful design, you can navigate the infrastructure and application lock-in introduced by cloud. And this is a journey many are navigating: a recent 451 Research survey indicates that for many, multi-cloud and hybrid deployments are the driving forces behind Kubernetes adoption.

In this talk we will classify the types of lock-in, the trade-offs in lock-in, and the considerations in adopting Open Cloud Native solutions.

// Referent

Brandon Philips Brandon Philips

is co-founder and chief technology officer of CoreOS. He leads teams building modern server infrastructure open source projects like Container Linux and enterprise products, like CoreOS Tectonic, the enterprise Kubernetes stack, and Quay, a private container image registry. He guides technical direction of cloud native technologies in the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. He leads the Technical Oversight Board of the Open Container Initiative, guiding open source communities building modern infrastructure and the technical future of projects essential to cloud native infrastructure stacks. Prior to CoreOS, he worked at Rackspace hacking on cloud monitoring and was a Linux kernel developer at SUSE. As a graduate of Oregon State's Open Source Lab, he is passionate about open source technologies and is a member of Oregon State's Council of Outstanding Early Career Engineers.